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Radio Hobby in Germany

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Radio Hobby in Germany

Hi everyone.

I am ne here but I´ve been reading these forums since quite a while. With this topic here I want to give you an overview how Radio hobby is done in Germany. The informations I am posting here might not be a hundret percent correct, but I am really into radio hobby and I´ve been gathering informations and other stuff about radio for quite some time now.

Let´s start with CB radio:

As far as I know in part 15 CB Radio is only allowed SSB and AM. Also there´s some kind of weird law that you are not permitted to broadcast over a certain distance (something 250+ miles or so). Here in Germany we started with 0.1W handheld CB Radio with 1 channel i think in the 70s and now we have

80 Channels AM FM and new: SSB. SSB Also is allowed with 12W but that is a problem because we have a law that if you have a transmitter + antenna that goes over 10W radiated power you have to send to "our" FCC (which is called BNETZA) a letter with measurements in which stands that your system (CB + antenna) does not get over the allowed field strengths. This is due to protection - protecting people from the electric fields. On the other hand we can in theory broadcast as far as we want. No radio like music broadcasting thou, but no limits like "not more than 250 miles"

Earlier we had 40 Channels FM 12 Channels AM (AM 1W) for a long time then came 80 channels where you had to register for and then they became free. Then came 4W Am on 40 channels and 4W with SSB - then SSB 12W...

We are allowed to use gateways and relay stations but they are only allowed on certain channels. At least thats what I know. Lately they allowed to make radio like broadcasts - like you read a text book into the microphone - but the thing is you are only allowed to do that... broadcast continously voice for
example for 30 minutes - you are only allowed to do that if after your messages people will reply and there will be a discussion about what has been read... so... yeah odd law - kinda.

Different countries use different channel steps. Germany for example Channel 4 is 27.005 and theres no channel that´s 27.000 but Poland has channels that are 27.000. In UK they are using completely (higher) frequenceis. CB Radio here goes from 26.565 to 27,405 (expanded 80 Channels) so even its all in EU they
have their different channel steps.

FRS - Family Radio Service --- here called PMR: Pocket Mobile Radio:

Is basically the same as Family Radio Service. 500mW on UHF but the
frequencies are different. I think FRS is in the 460Mhz range (466Mhz..)
PMR is 446.0 to 446.1 with 8 channels but they lately allowed it to be
combined with DPMR which is a digital version of PMR - the ´talkies therefore
are very expensive and work above the analouge PMR channels. But now they
allowed the analouge PMR to go on digital channels and allowed digital PMR
to go on analouge channels. So I think you now have 16 channels and its like
446.0 to 446.2 now. But I am not absolutely sure. Have been using PMR for my
radio hobby quite often. With good ´talkies you get 30 miles / 50km range
from a mountain line of sight no problem. But the same talkie does not go 3
miles in a town with big buildings.

Freenet Radio:

A german only thing. As industry asked for a licence free / cheap radio that
they can use for their workers - in the job (because PMR seemed to be like to
much of a toy for them) they got a special thing. It´s called freenet and uses
semi professionall Radios and the frequency is 149.0 to 149.1 Mhz.

Like on PMR you are not allowed to change the fixed antenna on the radio otherwise it would loose its licence free useability. I´ve also had one
of these. 100km Range with S9 signals is no problem from a mountain. Devices
for Freenet are very expensive compared to PMR and have a bigger antenna but
they seem to provide the best range.

Amateur Radio / Ham Radio:

German Amateur Radio operators have their (rent) 100kW shortwave station where they make some kind of "legal wannabe pirate radio" program every sunday. They want to make a show like old pirate radio but its legal. In their show they play old music and also have lots of technical details. For example they inform if there were changes in law of amateur radio or have reports from Ham fests or other Radio related topics. Also lots of advertising and attempting to
get people into amateur radio is transmitted there. Its on 6070 Khz every sunday at 11:00 (day) German time.

Getting the amateur radio licence here is far more expensive than in US. As far as I´ve read you pay less than 20 bucks for a licence and then you have to "re pay" every 10 years to be still allowed to use ham radio frequencies. Here you pay lets say more than 100 bucks to even get the licence and then you have monthly costs. They are not high. Like 2...4 bucks or so a month but the problem is if you don´t pay them you will get in trouble with the state because you owe this money to the state. Also you dont pay every month. After 3 years or so they send you a bill over like ~ 90 to 100 bucks to "re pay" for the last 3 years.

Amateur radio operators have an "OK" Ham spirit here. Once there was a small village where the people (IIRC even the major) were all aggainst the local amateur radio operator. He used big antennas and people claimed to get headache just from the antennas. They were kindy bullyig him.

Then amateur radio operators co worked with the BNETZA and prooved various times that his station is ok and far below the allowed maximum radiation levels. It even was in the news (and forums and probably also magazines) of the told above amateur radio shortwave radio transmitter.

Oh by the way we have 2 magazines here. If you are into "the club" which is called DARC - and as you can imagine is not for free - then you get a magacine called "CQ DL" every month. Also there´s another magacine called "Funkamateur". These magacines are about DIY projects, information about relays... projects and also offering things to buy for your amateur radio hobby.

Lots of frequencies and bands are allowed but we are NOT permitted to use AM - on the HF bands except 10 meters. So no AM on 160m 80m or 40m.

We have local amateur radio communitys and I am in some kind of lucky situation because I live in a village - which has even thou its small a very active amateur radio community. The members meet every month and have a local 70cm relay. Also they´re doin "fox hunt" (I took part on that a few times).

But thats pure luck you can also live in a city and have to drive far away to get amateur radio people around.

There are 2 different amateur radio licences. Class E is for beginners and allows nearly everything as class A does. It only is like instead of goin´ up to 750Watts on the HF bands you are limited to 100Watts and with class E you aren´t allowed to use 40m.

Class E and A are having the same test except class A has a much deeper technical test.

Oh by the way I don´t have an amateur radio licence. I´ve passed the easy online test a few times without problems and even the different one here and there but I personally do not yet see any advantages for me in taking the test and get the amateur radio licence.

On my location CB PMR and Freenet are poorely crowded. But as soon as I go on top of a mountain on PMR I hear 3 different stations overlaying each other on one channel. On Freenet I could reach someone in the past on a more or less reliable basis (I currently dont have anymore Freenet radio) and CB is also relatively crowded. Some "lets use it as a phone" people here but many "technically interested know their stuff" people their who use it as "ham radio light". Amateur Radio 2 meters and 6 meters not much going on. Some stations here and there on 70cm and LOTS of stations on shortwave.

I hope this short text gave you at least an rough, unsharp picture about our situation here. I could´ve written more but often had problems in other forums that my messages were just way to long and didn´t get posted. In the next post(s?) I will talk about radio transmitters and others

Radio sitaution in Germany

Now about Radio itself.

There are nomore officiall mediumwave stations. They have been turned off a few years ago. One year later longwave has also been turned off. I mean the public stations - not the band.

They say that it´s to expensive to keep an am station going. It does consum to much energy and that makes it to ineffective. Also their point was that only a few people are listening to AM and so it´s to expensive for them. So turning the dial via the day over LW or MW will only give you static or here and there some hissing and buzzing from a nearby LED bulb or SMPS.

Make your own radio station? Well... there is NO permission here like you have like "make .1W on am". All we have is an indirect allowness to broadcast to our old radios via inductive coupling. So make a weak transmitter - do not connect a wire antenna but connect a ferrite bar antenna. Keep the transmission power low (8 feet and you are ok altough there´s a number saying its -15dbµA/10m). BNETZA has confirmed various radio collectors including me "asking" them that it is ok if you are doing that as long as you keep the power low. Also they wrote something interesting in their reply. It was like "since you are using this transmitter for modulating your own program to your own radio, and do not public broadcast - radio laws are not touched". Something like that. As if they had been asked by lots of people about this topic.

Since - after my oppinion - Germany has a relatively active radio community (collectors - various ... partwise HUGHE radio museums...) some museum people had a "good connection" (As I kinda call it) and got a 1W licence for their radio museum. Interesting what ranges we´re talking here. As you´d expect it would be intended for their radio museum (house) there´s one museum which speaks of an official range of their 1Watt transmitter of 20 km ... thats more than 10 miles. I´ve read reports that their transmitter was picked up in static over a distance of 70km. Still this is legal.

Someone else has a 10kW transmitter and offers broadcast service. So you send him money, he will broadcast your show with 10kW. It´s also on 6070Khz.

And someone else has a 10W Station on shortwave. With a long wire antenna in the garden.

So it ... is ... possible to do privat radio - even legal, but a friend of me calling the BNETZA asking what he needs to do to set up a .1W AM transmitter and they just told him that he has to "do" lots of paper work to get it done (and also no chance if you don´t have the highest amateur radio class AND you must be... how shall I translate that ... umm... you must be into business or something like you have a company and a reason for broadcast... hard to translate for me right now). So ... the ppl on the radio museums seem sometimes to have no problems to get their licence but private person - very much trouble, barely possible. Even in 2k17. ... I mean in the early 90s or 80s you came in prison when you were caught doing pirate radio. They reduced it then so you have to pay money now if the catch you... but that also was more than 1 or even 2 decades (rather 2+) from now. Still - in 2017 - they are "sitting" on their frequencies.

On shortwave we have some frequencies that are allowed but if you have a closer look you´ll soon find out that it´s only for RFID applications. 13,56Mhz was very limited, but I´ve read that they at least changed the allowed bandwidth so now 1 single radio station would fit into that frequency range if you use AF limiter and keep the bandwidth low. They write it´s allowed to "broadcast" there with 10mW but with broadcast they just mean "10mW is allowed" but no word like "hey.. come on... make your own shortwave community radio"

There´s a frequency range on 26. someting to around 27.25Mhz which is for "experimental use". They allow 10mW and don´t specify a modulation type. So if you bend the law you could in theory make 1 Wideband FM station here and claim "it´s for research purpose". And yeah, it does collide with cb radio band so...

Broadcast your music over a further distance - Speakers and headphones

Early wireless headphones use VHF Frequencies. Typically 37.1 and 40,68Mhz. The last frequency is the equal to the US 49Mhz system. Also lots of baby monitors there. The headphones often have long antennas on transmitter and receiver set. Ranges are announced with 90 to 150 feet or 30 to 50 meters but practically I was able to easily cover 10 times the range by just applying a bigger antenna to the receiver - not touching the transmitter. Power allowed
is 10mW here.

Then came 433Mhz UHF Systems who brought the best range. Good transmitters had a like 25cm or around 12" antenna, and in my tests I was able to get "hissing" stereo from a transmitter to original headphone with line of sight from transmitter to headphone. If I would´ve positioned the transmitter outside the house on the roof or so it would´ve been a good signal.

Then came the "new" - thats how they advertised it - 863Mhz system. It goes from 863 to 865 Mhz and in that range 10mW is allowed. Tested lots of systems. They also have a good range but 1 mile is only doable if you place the transmitter outside the house, have line of sight, and even then there´s still static. Its weaker then 433mhz but stronger than VHF Systems due to their lack of long antennas on the receivers.

these are called "ISM" Frequencies. I´d have to look up what that means, but what it means is that you´re allowed to use these without applying a licence.

Driving with car / using communications receiver the 863mhz band is VERY crowded. Lots of people using wireless speakers / headphones on their TV or
PC or some of them just re broadcast a radio station or listen to a CD. Also a few stations were picked up on 70cm but it somehow got forbidden. So ... I don´t know if you are still allowed to use headphones there. There "was something" but I´m not sure if its either "do not use any headphones there" or "new headphones won´t be licenced on that band".

Wireless microphones are also most the time in the 863mhz for private people. There seems to be something around 832Mhz which is also licence free but other microphones work in TV UHF Band - you can use them, but you have to pay money each month for using them after you´ve registered them. Also with mobile phones here and there freuqencies often change and a mike that you bought now could be illegal in 2 or 3 months from then. There also was something in the 1.8Ghz? or so range analouge wirless microphone allowed there... don´t know if it still is...

Tv broadcasting??

Nope, no Ramsey TV transmitter here. We only have 2,4Ghz systems that usw FM.
There is - except amateur radio which doesnt allow you to broadcast cinema movies - no allowed TV broadcasting...

FM Radio band?

Has been forbidden for private broadcasting untill 2006. Then they allowed rockin´ 50 NANO - Watts...

You can get a 50mW or 10mW licence. But its hughe paper work and the licence is NOT intended to be radio programm. It´s rather like for car cinema.

There have been som AM activities here and there. People broadcasting on AM with 500W transmiter - legal - due to an "art project". The 863Mhz systems are more and more dissapearing - as other analouge systems. All they use now is more or less DECT baby monitors and digital 2,4Ghz wireless headphones. Just a few analouge signals "crawling ;)" around here and there.

Ok that was part 2 of short informations about radio in Germany

Radio hobby in Germany part 2

Now about Radio itself.

There are nomore officiall mediumwave stations. They have been turned off a few years ago. One year later longwave has also been turned off. I mean the public stations - not the band.

They say that it´s to expensive to keep an am station going. It does consum to much energy and that makes it to ineffective. Also their point was that only a few people are listening to AM and so it´s to expensive for them. So turning the dial via the day over LW or MW will only give you static or here and there some hissing and buzzing from a nearby LED bulb or SMPS.

Make your own radio station? Well... there is NO permission here like you have like "make .1W on am". All we have is an indirect allowness to broadcast to our old radios via inductive coupling. So make a weak transmitter - do not connect a wire antenna but connect a ferrite bar antenna. Keep the transmission power low (8 feet and you are ok altough there´s a number saying its -15dbµA/10m). BNETZA has confirmed various radio collectors including me "asking" them that it is ok if you are doing that as long as you keep the power low. Also they wrote something interesting in their reply. It was like "since you are using this transmitter for modulating your own program to your own radio, and do not public broadcast - radio laws are not touched". Something like that. As if they had been asked by lots of people about this topic.

Since - after my oppinion - Germany has a relatively active radio community (collectors - various ... partwise HUGHE radio museums...) some museum people had a "good connection" (As I kinda call it) and got a 1W licence for their radio museum. Interesting what ranges we´re talking here. As you´d expect it would be intended for their radio museum (house) there´s one museum which speaks of an official range of their 1Watt transmitter of 20 km ... thats more than 10 miles. I´ve read reports that their transmitter was picked up in static over a distance of 70km. Still this is legal.

Someone else has a 10kW transmitter and offers broadcast service. So you send him money, he will broadcast your show with 10kW. It´s also on 6070Khz.

And someone else has a 10W Station on shortwave. With a long wire antenna in the garden.

So it ... is ... possible to do privat radio - even legal, but a friend of me calling the BNETZA asking what he needs to do to set up a .1W AM transmitter and they just told him that he has to "do" lots of paper work to get it done (and also no chance if you don´t have the highest amateur radio class AND you must be... how shall I translate that ... umm... you must be into business or something like you have a company and a reason for broadcast... hard to translate for me right now). So ... the ppl on the radio museums seem sometimes to have no problems to get their licence but private person - very much trouble, barely possible. Even in 2k17. ... I mean in the early 90s or 80s you came in prison when you were caught doing pirate radio. They reduced it then so you have to pay money now if the catch you... but that also was more than 1 or even 2 decades (rather 2+) from now. Still - in 2017 - they are "sitting" on their frequencies.

On shortwave we have some frequencies that are allowed but if you have a closer look you´ll soon find out that it´s only for RFID applications. 13,56Mhz was very limited, but I´ve read that they at least changed the allowed bandwidth so now 1 single radio station would fit into that frequency range if you use AF limiter and keep the bandwidth low. They write it´s allowed to "broadcast" there with 10mW but with broadcast they just mean "10mW is allowed" but no word like "hey.. come on... make your own shortwave community radio"

There´s a frequency range on 26. someting to around 27.25Mhz which is for "experimental use". They allow 10mW and don´t specify a modulation type. So if you bend the law you could in theory make 1 Wideband FM station here and claim "it´s for research purpose". And yeah, it does collide with cb radio band so...

Broadcast your music over a further distance - Speakers and headphones

Early wireless headphones use VHF Frequencies. Typically 37.1 and 40,68Mhz. The last frequency is the equal to the US 49Mhz system. Also lots of baby monitors there. The headphones often have long antennas on transmitter and receiver set. Ranges are announced with 90 to 150 feet or 30 to 50 meters but practically I was able to easily cover 10 times the range by just applying a bigger antenna to the receiver - not touching the transmitter. Power allowed
is 10mW here.

Then came 433Mhz UHF Systems who brought the best range. Good transmitters had a like 25cm or around 12" antenna, and in my tests I was able to get "hissing" stereo from a transmitter to original headphone with line of sight from transmitter to headphone. If I would´ve positioned the transmitter outside the house on the roof or so it would´ve been a good signal.

Then came the "new" - thats how they advertised it - 863Mhz system. It goes from 863 to 865 Mhz and in that range 10mW is allowed. Tested lots of systems. They also have a good range but 1 mile is only doable if you place the transmitter outside the house, have line of sight, and even then there´s still static. Its weaker then 433mhz but stronger than VHF Systems due to their lack of long antennas on the receivers.

these are called "ISM" Frequencies. I´d have to look up what that means, but what it means is that you´re allowed to use these without applying a licence.

Driving with car / using communications receiver the 863mhz band is VERY crowded. Lots of people using wireless speakers / headphones on their TV or
PC or some of them just re broadcast a radio station or listen to a CD. Also a few stations were picked up on 70cm but it somehow got forbidden. So ... I don´t know if you are still allowed to use headphones there. There "was something" but I´m not sure if its either "do not use any headphones there" or "new headphones won´t be licenced on that band".

Wireless microphones are also most the time in the 863mhz for private people. There seems to be something around 832Mhz which is also licence free but other microphones work in TV UHF Band - you can use them, but you have to pay money each month for using them after you´ve registered them. Also with mobile phones here and there freuqencies often change and a mike that you bought now could be illegal in 2 or 3 months from then. There also was something in the 1.8Ghz? or so range analouge wirless microphone allowed there... don´t know if it still is...

Tv broadcasting??

Nope, no Ramsey TV transmitter here. We only have 2,4Ghz systems that usw FM.
There is - except amateur radio which doesnt allow you to broadcast cinema movies - no allowed TV broadcasting...

FM Radio band?

Has been forbidden for private broadcasting untill 2006. Then they allowed rockin´ 50 NANO - Watts...

You can get a 50mW or 10mW licence. But its hughe paper work and the licence is NOT intended to be radio programm. It´s rather like for car cinema.

There have been som AM activities here and there. People broadcasting on AM with 500W transmiter - legal - due to an "art project". The 863Mhz systems are more and more dissapearing - as other analouge systems. All they use now is more or less DECT baby monitors and digital 2,4Ghz wireless headphones. Just a few analouge signals "crawling ;)" around here and there.

Interesting!

A good perspective on how it is there, although a little complicated.

From what I understand besides CB, you can transmit with up to 10 watts power even on FM and AM bands license free but no music like a regular station. Can you do music or "regular " program at all on FM? or AM? even with less power? or in some other catagory?

10 watts is a lot though.....way more than we have here in North America.

Sure wish we had even 1/4 of that!

In Canada on FM we can have regular programming on FM with a max. field strength of 100uV/M@30meters. Nothing matters about transmitter power.

On AM either 250uV/M@30meters OR 100mW power with 3 meters combined antenna and ground but no limit on distance.

CB radio here in Canada license free is talk communication only 40 channels and max 4 watts but no limit on distance.

 

Mark

Welcome Stefan

Very good to hear from you in Germany.

I have been curious for a long time about low power radio in Deutschland but you are the first to say anything about it.

Mark, perhaps some of the references to "AM & FM" made by Stefan possibly referred to modulation methods and not the medium wave or "fm band", that's a guess.

And, along with Mark, I wonder if Germany has legal unlicensed low power broadcasting by hobbyists who run small radio stations with music and talk.

Carl Blare

Twente University SDR

I often listen to the European/UK CB bands over various WebSDR (web Software Defined Radio) like the one offered from Twente University in the Netherlands.

Sometimes the transmissions are short and quick others tend to get long winded for a minute or two then you hear nothing for 10 minutes. Usually in the 27 Mhz band (11 meters ) FM.

Other places like the UK or EU there is an active bunch talking like they do here in the U.S.
It's still a big deal over there as much as it is here.

Myself, not so much anymore. There is a lot of fighting on the CB bands in my state and I have all but given up on CB radio in favor of GMRS UHF. We need a license to use GMRS in the States but it is good for 10 years. Power is 2 to 50 watts hand held and base stations with repeaters or simplex operation.

 Barry of Blue Bucket Radio 1620 AM http://www.geocities.ws/bbrcomms/ - WQYY 664

In the USA we are NOW allowed

In the USA we are NOW allowed to talk as far as your Radio will transmit.  There is no more distance limit so you can work skip in the CB band.  Plus we have 40 channels 26.965-27.405 Mhz.  Channel 16, 36-40 are for SSB only.

 

We are allowed 4 Watts on AM and 12 Watts Peek Envolope Power on SSB.

Progressive Rock (Album Rock, Deep Tracks), Classic Rock

http://thelegacy.shorturl.com

More Power for Hobby Broadcasters

http://the-initiative.boards.net/

Radio Germany

Misunderstood about the "AM" and "FM" in my first comment.

Surprised that since the AM regular radio band(mediumwave) is empty you still can't really do any type of hobby broadcast at all, just 8 feet.

But 50 nanowatts on FM(88-108MHZ) or maybe 76-108 where you are, with no antenna restriction could get you to the neighborhood around you. Not as bad as you may think.

 

 

Mark

Radio situation in Germany

Hi there

thank you for your kind replies. I made a mistake and so I posted one post twice. It would be nice if an administrator would remove "post number 2" since it is a double post then.

However...

On cb it is like that we have 40 channels that are called CEPT Cannels. These are 40 Channels 4 Watts FM and seem to be used in lots of countries with the same channels.

For CB Radio you only can transmitt with 12 Watts on SSB. Other modulation types are limited to 4W.

I think there is no need to complain about CB Radio. What they allowed (with some pressure of cb radio producers behind it - at least thats what some people say) CB radio really could be called amateur radio ligth here.

As on most radios (also sometimes amateur radio) there is stron language or people fighting each other, but it is barely the case. Most time you meet people talking random stuff and on the other hand you meet people talking about technical things.

For radio like broadcasts - there is only talk allowed and you have to discuss the topic later.

CB Radio community is relatively active here. We have at least one great forum where CB and Amateur radio is beeing discussed with a big tendence of more CBers there than ham radio operators.

It even goes that far that people from that forum seem to be kinda involved in delveloping new CB Radios. You may know the AE2990 transceiver which is a handheld CB radio featuring SSB.

On the first modells there were lots of problems regarding the TX Power and especially SSB Modulation. SSB sounded bad, as if there was FM to the SSB and
it just was not OK.

So somehow through a long discussion in the forum about this specific CB Radio someone who knows or works for the manufactor got in contact with the dev team and they fixed the mistake because CB Hobbyists complained about the device and also someone found ot that a capacitor was to small in it´s value.

Also there are varois CB radio events organiced by the community. Like AM Contest where they only use old AM CB radios that have 12 channels and .5 Watts - then they test who they can contact.

With some shops offering an attractive price there is once every year (mostly june) the R A D event. On this event you may use your CB / Freenet / PMR talkie and attempt to reach as many contacts as possible. Write them down, and the person that has most contacts winns an attractive price. Could be a new CB Radio that has just been released... antenna... book or something like that.

I´ve taken part on that event a few times without registration (means no price) to test my equipment and I got lots of contacts then.

For FM and someone wrote "around neighbourhood".

It is nano watts. Ramsey FM 10 transmitter with BA1404 has 10mW thats 0.01W

50 Nano wats is 0. ... LOTS of 0 ... 5 Watts

So 1mW is 1000µW 1000nW is 1000µW... Lots of o´s

these transmitters were released in 2006 since the industry was releasing one transmitter after another and i think it also had to do with the evolution of mp3 players / cellphone able to play music. The intended use of these transmitters is to play your own music from any device to a radio that only has FM tuner and no possibility to connect an external audio source.

On an electronics forum people had calculated out how far the distance of one of these transmitters would be. Seeing the case that the transmitter is connected to an telescopic antenna and the radio also has a telescopic antenna.

They calculated out the field strength of the transmitter and somehow calculated out with the needed fieldstrength from the radio for the minimum
requirements for a good - noise free - stereo signal. Their result was that these transmitters have a maximum range of 2 meters (6...7 feet)

On package manufacturs have gotten greatfull with the range and write that the transmitters will have a range from 2... 10m or 6...30 feet. I have lots of these transmitters. The weakest one - I can lay it directly on the antenna of a good radio and on stereo there is still static becaus signal is weak and the strongest ones seem to be all about the same range. Depending on how you position them they will cover a small room with the radio´s antenna extended but they are FAR away from any useable range. Nothing with neighbourhood broadcasting here.

Once aggain there is this "you can rent 50mW on fm" thing. Most the time they only allow 10 mW and they measure and certify your transmitter. There is lot of
paperwork that needs to be done to get a licence and also it is not that easy. Not easy for private persons.

I saw a documentary where someone has a radio station. With a range of a good mile on a 10mW transmitter. He even has his listeners who call in and ask for
specific music beeing played. He said that he was only able to get his licenc because he was signing the licence for a "club / community" where he is in, otherwise he would´nt have had the licence.

Once I read (not sure if it was april fools or sth.) that BNETZA found out that many ppl are using that 10mW FM thing for their own radio station - which is not intended - and so they said that they will still allow these 10mW licences but the maximum power had been decreased from 50 to 10mW now.

Oh by the way... I´m very active in getting AM licenced here...

I post on various forums for radios - there are some around here - when there´s an option but sometimes I meet people who do NOT want to have an AM radio station around. Their reason would be that politic parteys would use it for their propaganda and also someone has made a ... calculation that from a 100mW transmitter that has 20dB supression on it´s 1st harmonic you would hear the signal on Amateur radio 160km (100 miles) ... err... ok...

I was even not asking for .1 Watt ... give is 10...30 mW or make something that "make amateur radio licence and you can get a special licence for your home AM radio" ... but there are lots of people interested in that but they are just to passive to do something.

Someone made a petition inspired by my many posts and this petition was about to get AM licenced here for everyone. ... Well ... there signed less than 1000 people so... I´m not sure if he even did send that petition to aonyone.

Also amateur radio operators seem to be barely interested in radio here. When AM stations got turned off, I listened a lot to shortwave 80 or 40m SSB but I didn´t hear anyone talking about that. In vintage radio forums (I know 4 big ones) as you can imagine people were unhappy.

A friend of mine called BNETZA as I said and they said him that he eventually could get a licence for broadcast. But then it would be shortwave only - because other bands are expensive - and off all that he heared on the phone it was bound to so much paperwork and beeing reliable that it is just not interesting.

That is what I think is very unfair. One radio museum wrote on its page something like "we´ve sent our wish for a frequency to the BNETZA and they instantiosuly allowed us to use that frequency"...

Having a toy around here like the "radio DJ" beeing 100% legal would be a dream for radio collectors.

Inductive transmission says 10m... and what I´ve found out is "if your signal is very weak on 10 meters it is still OK" BNETZA measures with a loop antenna with .8 meters in each direction... so in theory you can go up to 30 feet if you want to scratch on the limit but you stay on 8 feet range because then your transmitter can supplie the radio even if it has bad AM reception and thats what you need. Having 8 ft range you can "ensure" that your transmitter can be claimed to be legal.

Ok so far from me. Thanks aggain for your kind replies.

That's 4 watts output of an

That's 4 watts output of an unmodulated carrier on AM.

Druid Hills Radio AM-1710- Dade City, FL. Unlicensed operation authorized by the Part 15 Department of the FCC and our Resident Hobby Agent.  

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