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Reflections of a Low Power Faither

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Reflections of a Low Power Faither

Yes I have held a strong faith in the excellent position of low power radio as the world's most sophisticated hobby from its discovery early in the last century.

As a hobby, and for some an outright business, low power radio exceeds model railroading as a technically engaging pastime.

My vision is a world turned entirely around in which every household maintains a low power transmitter with programming selected by family committee and neighborhood interconnectedness achieved by kitchen commentary sent around the block.

Large powerful stations would consist of a single Traffic Information station that would provide vital public information, one per city.

National program networks would negotiate with neighborhood brokers who arrange airtime on personal low power stations.

As ideal as it would be, the corporate-military-combine has already crushed any hope by shifting mass attention to incomprehensible Wi-Fi virtual-reality direct-brain inter-faces that pull individual attention away from social success and more toward shopping opportunities.

Our low power radio forum sites are the last vistage of a once promising opportunity for individual people to succeed through kit building but participation has been on the decline because more people are being lost to the flicker of pixels in place of flesh.

We are the last of a kind. Prepare to sign off.

I dont know.. Once upon a

I dont know.. Once upon a time people thought TV was going to kill radio. I read some magazine articles from the 1970s that broadcasters were afraid that the invention and popularity of cassette tape decks were going to kill radio. Then CD players threatened to kill both LPs and cassettes, but now apparently LPs, cassettes and even reel to reel are begining to make a substantial comeback.

I can't think of any medium that has actually dissapeared since it's inception, except maybe to big laser disc and 8track cassette players (neither of which I ever cared for).

Rich Powers Part15, Take 2..

The Heart of the Matter

What it comes down to, Richard Powers, is that over these last few years the growth of the hobby, based on forum memberships, has been so small.

A hobby of such small scale doesn't seem likely to survive.

Our positive efforts to increase interest have been excellent in many ways, but in the final view have generated very little response.

Be all of it as it may, we will continue doing what we do because it matters to us, but there may be no one to follow once we leave the room.

Carl Blare

Ham Radio

For years there have been predictions and concern that ham radio is dying yet the statistics shown in this link show moderate growth:

http://ah0a.org/FCC/Licenses.html

Lacking any reliable database on Part 15 participants it is not possible to assess either the numbers or the trend.

Neil

 

It's all ebb and flow. The

It's all ebb and flow. The tide may be going out right now, but...

Rich Powers Part15, Take 2..

It was Rock 'n' Roll

Rock and roll and the "hit parade" saved radio from TV.

But I do think that the smart phone is the real killer of radio.

As for our hobby not gaining much ground, Carl said it best in a past post.....you don't want a lot of people doing this. You try to discourage others especially in your area from doing this as there are only so many frequencies and if others down the street do this too it would be bad, not good as all would be interfering with each other.

 

 

Mark

I've made the same point in

I've made the same point in the past when the "Inititive" was proposing a petition for the relaxation of the rules to enable legal unlicensed broadcasting capable of acheiving miles of range.. That will never happen, the same proposal has gone foward numerous times since the 1970's and everytime the FCC denied it because it's a complete contradiction to the very purpose of part15.

And even if by some wild and unlikey scenereo that they did relax the rules, it would inturn cause a substantial increase of peope buying transmitters with every Tom, Dick, and Harry on a whim taking advantage and paying their prefered playist on airwaves with everyone stomping all over each other and making the airwaves virtually useless for anyone.

As for smartphones kiling radio.. Again, there were numerous articles in Billboard magazine and some others during the 1970's which said the same thing about stereo cassete recorders when they began getting popular, the NAB was concerned it was to be the killer of radio.

I tend to believe terrestrial radio will continue to hold it's own just fine for the rest of our lifetime.

Rich Powers Part15, Take 2..

Return To Balanced Outlook

Mark has restored my confidence by quoting me: 

"As for our hobby not gaining much ground, Carl said it best in a past post.....you don't want a lot of people doing this. You try to discourage others especially in your area from doing this as there are only so many frequencies and if others down the street do this too it would be bad, not good as all would be interfering with each other."

Well that's right and so never mind my reflective lament over the hobby's rareity.

Things are better than they can be in this great hobby!

Carl Blare

Reply to Rich Powers

And analog radio more importantly for our hobby.

 

Mark

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